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This Week in Music History: October 6 to 12

Posted on: October 7th, 2014 by Ripple Creative Strategy No Comments

By Adam Bunch

A BIG HIT FOR K.D. LANG

It was 1992 and Canadian Music Hall of Fame inductee k.d. lang was at the top of her game. Her previous album – 1989’s Absolute Torch and Twang, recorded with her backing group, The Reclines – had been a huge hit. It raced up the charts and earned the singer some new hardware: she took home both the JUNO Award *and* the Grammy Award for best country female vocalist.

Now she had a new record. It was called Ingénue and it would prove to be an even bigger hit than her previous album. That year, lang’s songs were in regular rotation on radio stations all over the world. The album charted in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Germany and Japan. It was nominated for album of the year at the Grammys and won the award for best album at the JUNOs.

The biggest hit on the record would be one of the most popular singles of lang’s entire career. It would go on to inspire a Rolling Stones song and win the award for best female video at the MTV Video Music Awards. More than 20 years later, the song is still hailed as a Canadian classic. It was during this week in 1992 that “Constant Craving” peaked in the Top 40 of the Billboard charts.

“CONSTANT CRAVING” BY K.D. LANG

*****

AN EVEN BIGGER HIT FOR PAUL ANKA

This was also a big week on the charts for Canadian Music Hall of Fame inductee Paul Anka. In 1959, he was still just a teenager and pretty new to the world of pop stardom. His first big hit single, “Diana,”  wasn’t released until 1957. Just two years later he was already one of the biggest stars on the planet. Years before Beatlemania, Anka’s fans would shriek and scream and mob the Ottawa native wherever he went. In 1959, the 18-year-old put three different singles into the Billboard Top 10.

In July, “Lonely Boy” peaked at the very top, hitting No. 1. It ruled over the chart for four straight weeks before Elvis Presley finally knocked it out of the top slot.

Later, at the very end of the year, “It’s Time to Cry” followed that success by climbing all the way up to No. 5.

And between those two hits was “Put Your Head on My Shoulder.” During this week in 1959, it peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100. It would spend 11 weeks on the chart, a longer run that almost any other song released that year.

“PUT YOUR HEAD ON MY SHOULDER” BY PAUL ANKA

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